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Full text of "Commonwealth Futures : comprehensive community-wide service plan"




UMASS/AMHERST 

312066 0374 5947 3 




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COMMONWEALTH 






Si»» FUTURES 

nPC^O^ST COMPREHENSIVE COMMUNITY -WIDE 

SERVICE PLAN 

, i Massachusetts 

SECTION I - BASIC INFORMATION 

A. NAME OF COMMUNITY: Boston . — 

B . MANAGER 

NAME: Edward Dooley, Exective Director . 

ADDRESS : Boston Compact, Boston Publi c Schools _ 

26 Court Street T Boston. MA Q21Q8 , 



TELEPHONE ih. 7 26-6200X5 3 1 3 



C. PLAN SUMMARY: 

During the last two years, Boston has begun many new initiatives 
for at-risk youth. Through the Commonwealth Futures Committee, 
the Boston Public Schools, the Boston Private Industry Council, 
the Mayor's Office of Jobs and Community Services, the Boston 
Community Schools, the Boston Higher Education Partnership and 
the community service providers will develop a centralized 
information and support process for coordinating referrals, re- 
enrollment of dropouts, accreditation of community agency 
education services, and implementation of in-school and external 
alternative education programs. 

Commonwealth Futures will facilitate a communication and outreach 
strategy by disseminating to parents, school faculty and 
community organizations, a directory of the city's alternative 
education services. Futures will also provide BPS and 
alternative education teachers with new methods of instruction 
and counseling models developed for dropout prevention. These 
services will be presented through the Committee on a 
consultative basis. 

The Private Industry Council and the BPS will complete the 
expansion of Compact Ventures, a case management and remediation 
program for at-risk youth in ten high schools. Ventures will 
serve 1000 students throughout the system. 



D. TARGET POPULATION( S ) : BASED ON THE LIST OF YOUTH IDENTIFIERS 
INCLUDED IN THE GUIDELINES, PLEASE LIST THOSE AT-RISK YOUTH 
BY AGE GROUP WHO WILL RECEIVE SERVICES THROUGH THIS PLAN: 



Boston's public school population is unique in Massachusetts. 
Although BPS students comprise only 7% of all public school youth 
in the State, the city has 49% of all public school black 
students, 37% of all bilingual students, 24% of all Hispanic 
students, and 19% of all public school children on A.F.D.C. 

Boston has held a special attraction for new immigrants and 
emigrants alike - the richness of the city stems from its diverse 
residents as well as its diverse institutions. But Boston is a 
city of contrasts, with its freshly renovated neighborhoods and 
poorly maintained public housing; its healthy labor market and 
high resident underemployment; its many universities and high 
dropout rate. 

Many students in Boston can reasonably be considered at risk. The 
Boston Education Plan recently issued by the Superintendent - and 
the Commonwealth Futures community-wide service plan that 
supports its efforts - addresses the needs of all students who 
are failing to complete their educational objectives. 

Initiatives in the plan will serve students from all categories 
of at-risk youth included in the proposal guidelines: 

• Youths 16-22 no longer enrolled in school and without a 
diploma or GED. 

• Pregnant and parenting youth. There are approximately 
2000 births to teenagers in Boston each year. 

• Students retained during the last 4 years. 

• Youth in custody of DYS, supported by DSS or DPW, and 
on probation. Of the 400 Boston youth in custody of 
DYS, only 50 are enrolled in the BPS. DYS estimates 
that 200 of these youth are enrolled in alternative 
education programs, and 150 are dropouts. 

• Poor attenders or truants. Most students who fail have 
erratic attendance patterns. In one high school - 
fairly representative of the system - 20% of the 
student population failed due to poor attendance. 

• Students in the bottom quartile of standardized 
achievement tests. In many high schools, the mean 
percentile on standardized achievement tests in math 
and reading hovers around the thirtieth percentile. 
Therefore, half of all students in these schools score 
below the stated rate. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/commonwealthfuOOcomm 



Those who fail to receive credit in two or more major 
subjects. 

Expelled or chronically suspended students. 

Chemical substance abusers. 

Youth lacking proficiency in the English language. As 
described in the narrative above, 37% of all bilingual 
public school students are enrolled in the BPS. 



SPECIFIC MEASURABLE OUTCOMES (PLEASE LIST DROP -OUT /REENTRY, 
COMMUNITY- WIDE AND YOUTH OUTCOMES): 

1. Dropout/Reentry 

• Cut the number of students who drop out of school by 
one-half from 3000 to 1500 in five years. Since the 
full effect of new initiatives begun this year will not 
be evident immediately, we expect only modest gains - a 
decrease in the number of dropouts by 200 - during the 
second year of the Dropout and Re-Entry Plan. 

• Double the number of out-of-school youth who continue 
their education from 500 to 1000 in five years, we 
expect to increase the number to 600 this year. 

2 . Community 

• Commonwealth Futures Committee will coordinate efforts 
for at-risk youth, communicate plans to community 
constituents, and develop new initiatives from July, 
1987 - June, 1988. 

• Develop a matrix of school performance using available 
information which charts attendance, standardized test 
scores, post-graduation placement, dropout rates, and 
curriculum reference test scores from July 1, 1987 - 
June, 1988. 

• Create a School Incentive Program to recognize and 
reward schools with high rates of improvement in 
student attendance, achievement, and retention. At 
least one new program is scheduled to begin in October, 
1987. 

• Refine accreditation option of community agency 
alternative education programs and approve the 
curricula of five programs. 

• Coordinate referrals of dropouts and non-attenders 
centrally at BPS between September, 1987 and June, 
1988. 

• Develop a Community Service Agreement modeled on the 
Boston Compact which provides direct services to 
students and their families. Exploration of such an 
agreement will take place from September, 1987 - June, 
1988. 

• Establish a comprehensive list of community agencies 
providing alternative education, the target population, 
and services delivered by January, 1988. 




Plan a specialized intervention program for at-risk 
Hispanic youth; for instance, concentrating bilingual 
programs into fewer settings, and adding full time 
bilingual counselors in schools with large hispanic 
enrollments between July, 1987 and June, 1988. 

Pilot new student attendance incentives such as a "buy 
back" in one school from September, 1987 - June, 1988. 



Youth 



An additional 495 out-of-school youth will be enrolled 
in community-based education programs made available 
through the Alternative Education Initiative. 

A total of 1000 at-risk youth in ten schools will 
receive a comprehensive set of services including 
counseling and referral, outreach, and remediation once 
enrolled in Compact Ventures. Additionally, every 9th 
grader in Ventures schools will participate in 
motivational activities, clusters, and other events 
planned by teams of teachers and Compact Ventures 
staff. 

850 students in three Project Promise schools will take 
part in an extended day program with an enriched 
curriculum. 

The number of graduates receiving job placement 
services will be 1000, and 275 will receive higher 
education counseling and scholarship information. 



\ 



F. PLANNING TEAM 

1. Chair of Planning Team 
NAME: Jane Morrison 



ADDRESS ; Mayor's Office of Jobs and Community Services 

15 Beacon St. Boston, MA 02103 
TELEPHONE #: 720-4300 



2. Private Industry Council 

NAME: William Lawrence 



ADDRESS: 185 Devonshire St. Boston, MA 02110 



TELEPHONE #: 4 23-37 55 



3. Community-Based Agency 
NAME: Ja y Ostrower 



ADDRESS: ABCD 



178 Tremont St. Boston, MA 02111 



TELEPHONE #; 357-6000 
4. Local Government 
NAME: Jane Morrison 



ADDRESS : Mayor's Office of Jobs and Community Services 
15 Beacon St. Boston, MA 02108 



TELEPHONE #: 72 0-4300 



5. Public School Administration 
NAME: Edward Dooley 



ADDRESS: Boston Public Schools 



26 Court St. Boston, MA 02108 



TELEPHONE #: 726-6200 



6. Business 

NAME: William Spring 



ADDRESS: Federal Reserve Bank of Boston 



Atlantic Ave. Boston MA 02106 



TELEPHONE #: 973-3460 



7. Human Services 

NAME: Shirley Carrington 



ADDRESS: Roxbur Y Multi-Service Center 



317 Blue Hill Ave. Boston, MA 02121 



TELEPHONE #: 427-4470 
8. Labor 

NAME: Joseph Joyce 



ADDRESS : Greater Boston Labor Council 



TELEPHONE #: 



9. Higher Education 
NAME: Robert Sperber 



ADDRESS ; Boston Higher Education Partnership 

147 Bay State Rd . Boston, MA 02215 

TELEPHONE # : 353-2252 

10. Teacher 

NAME: Albert Vasauez 



ADDRESS: 



.Boston Public Schools 



26 Court Street Boston, MA 02108 



TELEPHONE 0: 726-6200 



11. Parent 

NAME: Loretta Roach 



ADDRESS: 16 School Street 



Dorchester, MA 02124 



TELEPHONE #; 542-2835 
12. Student 

NAME: 



ADDRESS: 



TELEPHONE #: 



13. Teen Pregnancy Coalition (if applicable) 

NAME: 



ADDRESS: 



TELEPHONE #: 

14. Other ( 

NAME: Elizabeth Bonner 



ADDRESS: BERC 



80 Broad St. Boston, MA 02110 

TELEPHONE C : 3 3 8-1444 

15. Other ( 

NAME: Nelson Colon 



ADDRESS: HOPE 



55 Dimmock St. Roxburv, MA 02119 



TELEPHONE #: 44 2-9401 



8 



16. Other 
NAME: 

ADDRESS: 



17. Other 

NAME: 

ADDRESS: 



Michael Griffin 

Boston Community Schools 



26 West St. Boston, MA 02111 



725-4920 



Charlotte Harris 



Boston Public Schools 



26 Court St. Boston, MA 02108 



726-6200 



18. Other 



NAME: 



ADDRESS: 



Daniel Singleton 

Boston Housing Authority 

1156 Tremont St. Boston, MA 02120 

427-5721 



19. Other 

NAME: 

ADDRESS: 



20. Other 



NAME 



ADDRESS: 



Beatriz Strohmeyer 

Cardinal Cushing Center 

1375 Washington St. Boston, MA 02118 

542-9292 

Deborah Jencunas 

Brighton High School 

25 Warren St. Brighton, MA 02135 

782-2061 



21. Dys 

NAME: 
ADDRESS: 



Michael Devlin 



145 Causeway Street 



Boston, MA 



727-7575 



22. 



Commonwealth Futures Staff 



NAME: 
ADDRESS 



Jacqueline Rasso 
Boston Public Schools 



26 Court Street 



Boston, MA 02108 



726-6200 x5398 



10 



SECTION II - IMPLMENTATION PLAN 

A. Planned Drop-out/Reentry Outcomes 

Dropouts in Boston are defined as those students who leave the 
public schools with discharges to work, marry, enter the 
military, or simply because they turned sixteen. Dropouts also 
include youth who fail to report to school in September, and for 
whom no forwarding address is left, or no transcript is 
requested. 

Student loss is measured in two ways. Last year, the Office of 
Research and Development conducted a cohort analysis of student 
loss from the class of 1985. All students who reported to school 
at least one day were were followed through the graduation year 
plus a thirteenth year. Then using the cohort technique, 
dropouts, transfers, and other elements of student loss were 
calculated. 

The dropout rate for the cohort beginning high school in 1981- 
1982 was 43.6%. Other data showed males dropping out at a higher 
rate than females - 58.69% vs. 41.31% - and that Hispanics 
consistently had the highest dropout rate across the cohort 
years. The ninth and tenth grades which have the highest 
enrollments produce a disproportionate share of dropouts. 

Student loss is also determined each year. During the 1985-19e*2 
school year 14.3% of all secondary BPS students dropped out, ar.i 
1.4% were probable dropouts bringing the total to 15.7%. This 
number, however, gives an imprecise picture of student loss, 
since many dropouts in a given year will choose to continue their 
education at a later time. The cohort analysis is, with its 
inclusion of a thirteenth year, a more accurate description of 
student progress through the public school system. 

Currently, youth who leave the public schools but enroll in 
community programs are counted as dropouts, since there is no -ay 
to track their movement through external education programs. 7~.e 
BPS Department of Curriculum and Instruction will establish ar. 
office to monitor student progress through alternative educat: r. 
options centrally. 

Students will remain on the rolls of their home highschool whi.e 
earning academic credit at alternative programs, and may receive 
a diploma from the BPS as well. With these youth still accounted 
for on high school enrollment lists, the dropout rate is expected 
to decrease. Future cohort analyses will include the data on 
students in education alternatives to provide real statistics sr. 
student loss. 



11 



B. Planned Community Outcomes 

For the past nine years, the City of Boston has maintained a 
network of community organizations throughout the city which have 
provided alternative education services to school dropouts. 
These programs began in the late 1970' s as an innovative part of 
Boston's youth employment programs funded through the federal 
Youth Employment Demonstration Projects Act (YEDPA). Although 
Boston suffered massive cutbacks in employment and training funds 
with the demise of YEDPA in 1980 - 1981. However, the City of 
Boston and the Private Industry Council made the continuation of 
these programs a major priority for Job Training Partnership Act 
funds. The activity in Boston which has produced the Boston 
Compact was conceived in part as a way to help replace services 
lost through the federal cuts. As a result, those organizations 
which have continued to provide education and employment services 
to dropouts have emerged as an alternative system. 

These programs have provided effective alternative education each 
year to hundreds of youth. However, there has been no formal 
linkage between the alternatives and the Boston Public Schools. 
While individual programs have referral and credit arrangements 
with individual high schools or with the School Department, there 
has not been a formal structure for including the programs as a 
system within the constellation of available services for Boston 
school children. 

The formalization of credit arrangements with community 
alternatives puts Boston at the forefront of educational reform 
in this area across the nation. It requires the school system to 
change its operations in order to keep track of out-of-school 
youth and construct a flexible, but ordered, system which allows 
students to move between alternative education programs and the 
public schools. 

1. Accreditation Options 

Through Commonwealth Futures, the Boston Public Schools, the 
Boston Private Industry Council, the Mayor's Office of Jobs and 
Community Services, the Boston Community Schools, and community 
service providers will develop a centralized system for 
coordinating and certifying the education services of dropouts as 
part of the Boston Public Schools. The first steps have been 
taken during the current year. The community organizations that 
are part of the Mayor's Office network have been cooperating with 
the School Department's Office of Curriculum and Instruction to 
develop an approved program of instruction for academic year 1987 
- 1988. 

A memorandum of understanding between the Superintendent and the 
alternative providers which will enable the development of a 
system-wide approach towards the granting of academic credit and 
the provision of alternative education service leading to earned 



12 



credit from the appropriate Boston high school has been developed 
and will be operational for the coming school year. The 
Commonwealth Futures Advisory Team serves as the oversight 
committtee for this process. Its expanding membership provides a 
constituency for change which will increase participation of 
community organizations in the Alternative Education Initiative 
begun this year through the joint efforts of the Mayor's Office 
and the School Department. 

2. Referral 

Currently, there is no coordinated practice in place between 
community providers, nor between CBO's and the public schools, 
for referral and outreach of dropouts to appropriate educational 
services. As part of the establishment of more formal 
connections between the Mayor's Office network of alternatives 
and the Boston Public Schools, a referral system will be 
developed which will identify dropouts and potential dropouts 
from the public schools, and refer them to approved community 
providers or in-school dropout prevention programs. 

The overall plan for at-risk youth, including the expansion c* 
Compact Ventures, Project Promise, and the alternative network 
includes outreach, case management, and referral for at-risk 
youth in schools as well as dropouts in the community. (These 
will be described in more detail in the next section. ) 

As part of Commonwealth Futures, a centralized information a: 
support process for referral and enrollment will be establish 
within the School Department. This service will coordinate ~ 
high school headmasters and faculty to assist in identifying 
dropouts and potential dropouts; refer dropouts to appropriate 
alternative providers; assist in re-enrollment into the publ. 
school system where needed; arrange mechanisms for completior 
academic credit; and serve as a back-up support service betwe*» 
the out-of -school alternatives and the individual high schoc . 

The purpose of this central capacity will be to enhance and 
assist in facilitating referrals and credit, not to manage tr- 
process centrally for the schools. This is based upon the 
consensus of the Futures Committee that the people and proce: 
best informed about dropouts and potential dropouts are in tr.e 
schools themselves. This office will also maintain formal, 
routine contact with Compact Ventures case managers and Bost 
Community Schools outreach workers. 

Part of this central referral system will be the development 
an up-to-date listing of community organizations which provide 
alternative education and supportive services. The Commonwea . 
Futures Committee will oversee the development of this direc* 



13 



3. Coordination 

Commonwealth Futures will provide coordination of services to at- 
risk youth in four areas: 

• Planning and Community/ School Coordination: A full-time 
staff position to coordinate all activities for the 
Futures advisory committee both within the school 
system and among the intermediary organizations and 
community providers involved, including staff work 
necessary tc orchestrate a Community Service Agreement 
which will explore ways to expand upon existing 
community service involvement in the public schools. 

• Alternative Education Coordination: A full-time 
position within the Department of Curriculum and 
Instruction to centralize credit earning, referral, and 
re-enrollment of dropouts into the collaborative 
system. This position will be funded for one year. 

• Alternative Education Support: Coordination among the 
educational providers contracted through the Mayor ' s 
Office of Jobs and Community Services to assure 
successful implementation of expanded alternative 
services to dropouts. 

• Staff Training: Provision of training in dropout 
prevention for teaching staff in the BPS and in 
alternative programs to re-tool educational programs to 
be in keeping with School Department standards, 
guidelines, and timetables. This will be provided 
through Commonwealth Futures on a consultive basis. 

4. School Performance Goals 

During the summer, 1987, a matrix of school peformance based on 
the Compact goals - attendance, standardized test scores, 
curriculum referenced test scores, dropout rates, and post- 
graduation placement - will be developed for implementation 
during school year 1987-88. These will be goals for each school, 
which will mirror the overal system goals of the Boston Compact, 
which have been in place since 1982. Individual school goals 
will be set and school plans will be written by school 
administrators to describe how these objectives will be achieved. 

A system of incentives such as discretionary grants will be made 
available to schools showing improvement in their selected goal 
areas, and resources will be available to schools with innovative 
initiatives through such programs as the Boston Plan for 
Excellence. 



14 



5. Program Descriptions 

Superintendent Laval S. Wilson's Boston Education Plan calls for 
the refinement and further development of the $2 Million 
initiative for at-risk youth begun this year. The 
Recommendations for At-Risk Youth which have been forwarded to 
the Boston School Committee call for the continuation of Compact 
Ventures, the further expansion of Project Promise, and the 
continuing development and maintenance of the programs which 
resulted this year from cooperation among the School Department, 
the Community Schools, the Private Industry Council, and the 
Mayor's Office of Jobs and Community Services. The programs 
described below, particularly Compact Ventures, Project Promise, 
and the Job Collaborative, require changes in the structure and 
curricula of participating schools which have offerred to become 
program sites. 

This set of interrelated programs forms the centerpiece for 
Commonwealth Futures planning and service to dropouts and 
potential dropouts in Boston. 

Compact Ventures 

Ventures is a cooperative program between the Private Industry 
Council, the Boston Public Schools, and the Mayor's Office which 
has operated for three years in Boston high schools. For two 
years, Ventures was a pilot project at Dorchester and English 
High Schools, where its results in reducing the dropout and non- 
promotion rate for 9th graders were impressive. The program cut 
the dropout rate in half by concentrating remediation, 
coordinative, and incentive services on targeted 9th grade 
students, and provided alternative education to identified 
students on a contracted basis. 

For the current school year, this cooperation has expanded 
significantly. The Boston School Department, as part of the 
Superintendent's $2 million initiative, has enabled Ventures to 
build upon existing support from the Office of Training and 
Employment Policy to expand to a total of 10 Boston high schools 
whose dropout rates are highest in the Boston system. The 
expansion took place between January and April, 1987. 
Additionally, three of the 10 schools have been able to expand 
their Ventures programs to serve targeted students from all four 
high school grades. This expansion represents a major commitment 
by the Boston Public Schools to cooperate with the employment and 
training system in a joint venture to reduce the dropout rate and 
help Boston youth develop skills necessary for employment. 

Ventures programs include five areas of service: 

• Case management: Program staff develop a caseload of 

students identified as potential dropouts, and advocate for 
them in getting the appropriate services and assistance they 
need - from their school, community organizations, 



15 



businesses, universities, health providers, and other 
services. Case managers also provide classroom instruction 
and counseling. Case managers recruit and train interns and 
other paraprofessional and volunteer staff to assist the 
school in addressing needs of the students. 

• Education coordination: Low achieving students are 
identified and grouped for part of their instruction in 
classes which provide extensive basic education remediation. 

• Remediation: Remediation Specialist staff provide each 
Ventures school with additional teachers with expertise in 
academic remediation in basic subjects. Remediation 
Specialists work with teachers on curriculum, set up and 
staff tutoring centers, and enable Ventures schools to 
institute team teaching and planning sessions as a regular 
part of the daily teaching schedule. 

• Outreach: Program staff serve as liaisons between the 
teaching staff and parents and family members. Daily home 
contact for non-attending students, home visits, and 
staffing for special events and trips during non-school 
hours are provided. Outreach workers are chosen who can 
serve as role models for students and advocates for parents. 

• Career development: An important aspect of Ventures is the 
provision of career preparation, job placement, and worksite 
support for appropriate Ventures students. Ventures staff 
work closely with the PIC Career Specialists and School 
Guidance Counselors to assist students in making and shap.r. ; 
decisions related to employment and continuing education. 
Career Specialists will attempt to place Ventures students 
in summer jobs at the end of their 9th Grade experience. 

For the current year, the Boston Private Industry Council has 
provided management, job development, case management, staff 
training, career development, outreach, and coordination of 
Compact Ventures in cooperation with the School Department. 
Funding from OTEP to continue the PIC's lead role in Ventures . s 
a critical aspect of the Commonwealth Futures plan. 

In order to complete the expansion of Compact Ventures, we are 
seeking funds from the Office of Training and Employment Policy, 
as well as from the School Department. A budget was submitted * : 
OTEP in the amount of $300,000 - all of which is not guaranteed. 
A decrease in the amount would require trimming the PIC case 
management staff as is noted in Section V Part B, Gaps in the 
Service Newtork. 

Additionally, the School Department is seeking continuation of 
support from the Department of Education through Chapter 188 tc 
maintain aspects of Compact Ventures for next year. For the 
coming year, the PIC will continue to coordinate all case 
management services for Ventures. 



16 



Students are identified for enrollment in Compact Ventures often 
before the first day of school. Using profiles on incoming 
students, school administrators and case managers select students 
who are two or more years behind grade level in English or 
mathematics, overage for grade, and students with a history of 
poor attendance or behavioral problems. During the first 
semester, teachers, parents, and community agencies make 
referrals to Ventures staff. 

Project Promise 

While funding for Project Promise is not included in the 
appropriation for at-risk youth, the design of the program has 
been incorporated in the Superintendent's overall plan for 
improving the basic skills of all middle school youth in the 
system who are not functioning at grade level. 
Project Promise includes extending the school day in middle 
schools to include an additional hour and a half of instruction 
each day and three hours on Saturdays. Beginning next year, 
students in middle schools who score below the 25th percentile in 
reading or math will join basic skill clusters in middle schools 
that will implement a Project Promise extended day schedule. 

City Roots 

City Roots is a network of ten community-based alternative high 
school programs, four of which were opened this year as part of 
the $2 million Alternative Education Initiative sponsored by the 
Mayor, the School Committee, and the Superintendent. Two hundred 
and fifty out-of-school youth aged 16 to 21 receive basic skill 
instruction, G.E.D. preparation, education and job counseling and 
job placement services throughout the school year. City Roots is 
a nine-month program providing 25 hours per week of classroom 
instruction in math, reading, writing, social studies, and 
science. 

Back To School 

Back To School is a transitional remediation and support service 
enrolling middleschool-aged youth who have dropped out of school, 
but will return to the public schools. The program serves 
seventy-five 12 to 15 year olds in three neighborhood sites with 
high dropout rates. Back To School students receive academic 
credit for completion of the course of instruction and achieving 
attendance standards during one academic year prior to post- 
placement in a public middle school. Two of the three sites were 
begun this year under the Alternative Education Initiative. 

Mayor's Office of Jobs and Community Services 

The Mayor's Office of Jobs and Community Services with the Boston 
Private Industry Council manages a network of alternative 
education providers through the Job Training Partnership Act 
under which more than 500 students receive services. The Office 



17 



provides technical assistance, management information system 
reports on enrollments, and evaluation services to a plethora of 
community-based organizations throughout the city. The number of 
seats available in this network was increased this year by the 
Alternative Education Initiative. 

Job Collaborative 

An ongoing ince -ve program for high school students is the 
Private Industry Council's Job Collaborative located at 14 
secondary schools in the city. Career Specialists teach 
employability and job retention skills to students who are later 
placed in jobs and monitored by the PIC staff. A total of 967 
graduates from the class of 1986 were placed in permanent jobs.- 
2600 students worked in jobs pledged by local businesses to the 
Boston Summer Jobs Program. 

Access and Higher Education Information Center 

Access provides financial aid planning for seniors in high sc 
applying for college admission. Access advisors in each schc 
meet individually with students to assist them in filling out 
financial aid forms and applying for Access "last dollar" 
scholarships. The Higher Education Information Center locate -1 «* 
the Boston Public Library offers workshops and materials of 
interest to students seeking information about university and 
college programs. 

C. Planned Youth Outcomes 

1. Public Information and Education 

All programs in the community-wide service plan have extensive 
community outreach and referral components. In general, at-: 
students attending public schools will learn about in-school 1 
community-based alternative programs from teachers, guidance 
counselors, school administrators, and program staff such as 
managers and outreach workers. Out-Of -School youth will lear- 
about these same programs through social service agencies , 
churches, the BPS, outreach workers, health clinics, tenants 
forces at BHA projects, and other community-based organizati 
Student participants in the programs decribed above are ofter 
best recruitment agents, and provide word-of -mouth 
recommendations to other youth. 

At the same time, families of at-risk youth will learn about 
special services from school personnel, particularly homeroor 
teachers and outreach workers who maintain contact with parer.* - 
and guardians on a regular basis. Last year, coordinators ma:- 
presentations about their programs at parent groups and tenar. * 
associations in Boston neighborhoods, and in addition, develop-: 
relationships with staff at community agencies. Parent 
newsletters were also sent home to the families of in-school 
youth which contained information about available services. 



18 



To help disseminate information about existing services, the 
Commonwealth Futures Committee will develop a directory of 
programs operating for at-risk youth, their target populations, 
services, and locations. This directory will be printed as a 
handy guide for all professionals working with youth in schools 
and in the community. 

Additionally, the Superintendent has made a committment to 
publish a calendar of important school department dates which 
will be distributed to parents, and an annual report on the 
Boston Public Schools. These publications will be be developed 
under the direction of the Commonwealth Futures staff. 

2 . Identification/Recruitment/Enrollment 

In-school youth at risk of dropping out are identified by 
guidance counselors, teachers, administrators, and case managers. 
In some instances, as with Compact Ventures, in-coming students 
are identified before the start of the school year by using the 
following criteria: two or more years behind grade level, overage 
for grade, and poor attendance/behavioral records. These youth 
are interviewed by program staff to determine eligibility, after 
which an appropriate referral to an in-school or community 
alternative is made. Teachers also make referrals during the 
year as problems emerge. This method is used throughout the 
comprehensive set of programs described in the community-wide 
plan. 

Out-Of-School youth are recruited by outreach workers assigned to 
various neighborhoods and housing projects. Community agencies, 
churches, and other institutions working with young people 
identify those who would like to return to school or enter a 
training program, and again, students are interviewed by program 
staff. 

Once identified, youth fill out intake forms associated with the 
program they will enter, and generally they are asked to set 
goals for personal achievement. 

3. Assessment and Case Management 

In order to determine the skills of students entering the 
programs, academic assessments are made by teachers, and personal 
needs are assessed through interviews with students and in the 
home. Support staff gather additional information from former 
teachers, probation officers, social workers, or other 
professionals linked with the students. The particular 
instruments used for assessments are left to the discretion of 
the programs themselves. 

Depending on the services provided by the individual program, 
students are referred to outside organizations which can deliver 
non-academic service needs such as job placement, counseling, 
health services. The case management approach - used now in in 



19 



some fashion in nearly all programs - insures that youth progress 
from one level to the next since one person, a case manager, 
teacher, or an outreach worker, is responsible for overseeing the 
progress of each student. Commonwealth Futures support for the 
coordination of Boston's plan centrally will enable us to develop 
a transition mechanism in insure service adjustments as youth 
move from one level to another. 

4. Progress Monitoring 

Each program sets specific goals for students and progress 
towards these goals is measured on a regular basis - by marking 
term in school-based programs, or by some other interval in 
community alternatives. The objectives include an attendance 
standard, academic competencies, behavioral expectations, and 
where appropriate, scores on standardized tests and diploma 
points. 

Data is gathered centrally by the JCS management information 
system which enters the number of positive and negative 
terminations recorded by each individual program funded by the 
JCS alternative service network. Performance contracts made 
between service providers and JCS insure reporting on each 
student's success during her enrollment in the project. Other 
data collected reflects ethnic composition, neighborhood 
representation, family size, family income, age, and the number 
of BHA residents enrolled. 

The data on individual students on public school rolls is also 
shared with school administrators, and students' families who 
decide together the level of service offered to the student after 
completion of a prior level. 

Successful transitions from one component of the community-wide 
plan to another will insure steady progress and lasting change 
for at-risk youth. Students with a history of failure will not 
turn around in a year, perhaps not two; however constant 
attention to the level of service and the high quality of the 
personnel staffing our programs will help Boston students reach 
their full potoential. 



20 



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SECTION III - LOCAL MANAGEMENT PLAN 

A. Description 

Management of the Commonwealth Futures project will be the 
responsibility of the Office of the Superintendent of Schools. 
All aspects of the program are connected organizationally through 
the Boston Compact. Because improvement of the current dropout 
rate is one of the terms of the Compact, a structure has evolved 
over the past year which has made the Compact the linchpin for 
connecting the activities of the PIC, the Community Schools, the 
Mayor's Office of Jobs and Community Services (JCS), and the 
alternative education providers to the School Department. 

Organizations : The lead organizations for this plan include the 
Boston Public Schools, the Mayor's Office of Jobs and Community 
Services, the Boston Private Industry Council, the Boston 
Community Schools, and the Boston Higher Education Partnership. 
Key operational staff from each of these organizations are 
members of the Commonwealth Futures Committee. 

• PIC: As a contractor and managing organization for Compact 
Ventures, the PIC maintains client information on all 
Ventures students and reports to JCS on a routine basis. PIC 
is also the lead organization for all aspects of career 
development and job placement for in-school youth. The PIC 
Board of Directors shares with JCS policy-making leadership 
for all aspects of JTPA funds which constitute much of the 
funding for the alternative education network. 

PIC is also contracted by the School Department to provide 
case management services for Ventures. The Superintendent 
of Schools is a member of the PIC Board of Directors. The 
PIC is the lead business intermediary in all business 
aspects of the Boston Compact. 

• Boston Public Schools: The School Department is the lead 
organization for funding and managing the $2 million 
initiative described in this plan. The School Department is 
responsible for all information on student dropout rates, 
enrollment, attendance, and achievement of students who will 
be served in school-based prevention programs (Ventures and 
Promise) as well as those students re-enrolled in BPS 
through the community programs. The School Committee will 
subcontract services in alternative education, outreach, and 
case management to JCS, the Community Schools, and the PIC, 
respectively. The Executive Director of the Boston Compact, 
who reports directly to the Superintendent, will serve as 
the project manager accountable for all aspects of 
Commonwealth Futures. 



27 



• Jobs and Community Services: JCS staff will serve as Chair 
for Commonwealth Futures. Additionally, JCS is the 
contractor for those aspects of Ventures funded by OTEP. 
JCS has management, monitoring, and evaluation 
responsibility for all aspects of the alternative education 
network, and will be a contactor for the School committee to 
develop credit-earning alternative programs. 

• Boston Community Schools; The Community Schools will 
continue to provide contracted services in alternative 
education and outreach as part of the $2 million initiative. 
Outreach and alternative education will be coordinated 
between the School Department, the Community Schools, JCS, 
and the PIC through the Boston Compact office. 

• Community-Based Organizations: A number of community-based 
organizations will participate in the planning and 
development of Commonwealth Futures activities. In addit.cr. 
to providing alternative education and other supportive 
services, Representatives on the Committee will seek to 
develop the Community Service Agreement in order to 
coordinate the education and support already provided by 
individual agencies. 

• Boston Higher Education Partnership: The 23 major post- 
secondary institutions which make up the higher educaticr 
consortium will continue to provide teacher fellowships 
support for students and graduates in the form of 
scholarships and guidance assistance for college-bound 
youth, and support for the Higher Education Center at tr*- 
Boston Public Library. The new Leadership Academy manage: 
by Boston University is one example of new staff develops - 
assistance being developed by local colleges and 
universities as a consequence of the Compact. 

Directors of the Higher Education Information Center and 
ACCESS will be invited to join the Commonwealth Futures 
Committee in order to represent these programs - f inane . « 
supported by the lead organizations mentioned above - wr 
deliver direct services to public school students. 

Commonwealth Futures activities will be reported routinely t 
Boston School Committee, the PIC Board of Directors, and the 
Mayor as part of the on-going maintenance and operation of tr* 
program. 

The Serivce Delivery Area and the BPS together will be 
responsible for the management information systems; each 
reporting on enrollments and client progress. BPS Budget Off. 
will be charged with preparing subcontracts for participating 
organizations. 



28 



Information will be brought regularly to the Commonwealth Futures 
Committee for evaluation. Program design changes recommended by 
the operators of the individual initiatives will be considered on 
a semi-annual basis, and included in the community-wide service 
plan annually. 



29 



SECTION III - LOCAL MANAGEMENT PLAN 



B. Organizational Chart 



PIC Board 



School Committee 



Higher Ed. 



CBOs 



Local Government 



Chairperson 



Commonwealth Futures Committee 



Project Director 




Compact 
Ventures 


STEP 


Project 
Promise 


Alternative 

Education 

Initiative 


Community 
Schools 


i 

Job 
Collab. 


Boston Higher 
Ed. Partnership 


ACCESS 


Higher Education 
Information Ctr. 


Schools within 
Schools 



30 



SECTION IV - MONITORING/REPORTING 

The action plans for this year's at-risk efforts holds each 
agency accountable for the particular initiatives under its 
pervue. The plans specify the number students to be served, 
including schools, neighborhoods, and target populations, and 
sets measurable goals for enrollments and positive outcomes. 

Enrollment data from schools and community-based organizations 
involved in dropout prevention and school improvement will be 
collected by the appropriate city agencies (Boston Community 
Schools, Jobs and Community Services, the Private Industry 
Council, and the School Department); the results of each aspect 
of the plan will be evaluated and reported to the Commonwealth 
Futures Committee and the Superintendent. 

In June, 1988, a full report of participants and the year's 
outcomes from each lead organization described in the section on 
local management will be submitted to the Superintendent and the 
Commonwealth Futures Committee. These reports will be measured 
against the planned outcomes listed in our community-wide plan. 
Adjustments will be made to the plan taking into account the 
yearend results and new strategies will be developed to address 
outcomes not achieved. 



31 



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SECTION V - RESOURCES 

B. Program/Service/Network Gaps 

Although Boston leads the nation in innovative strategies for 
school improvement, and lead organizations are clearly identified 
to manage the various aspects of the Boston Compact and the 
Dropout and Re-Entry Plan, we are beginning to discover the need 
for increased coordination among those institutions. New parts 
of the plan such as the accreditation option and student transfer 
and post-placement services need intensive attention from school 
department, JCS, and Commonwealth Futures staff in order to break 
new ground. For this reason, our request to Commonwealth Futures 
centers around coordination support. 

The first cohort analysis of student loss published in May, 1987 
confirmed reports that the Hispanic dropout rate across the 
cohort years far exceeded the 43% dropout rate recorded for the 
system. Bilingual students also dropped out at greater numbers 
than monolingual youth, although bilingual programs seem to 
provide a buffer until students are transitioned to the 
mainstream. These statistics point to a service gap in the 
community- wide plan. One community outcome described in Section 
1 is the development of an intervention for hispanic youth which 
would be implemented in September, 1988. This will be part of a 
overall scheme to reduce the dropout rate of Hispanic youth 
designed by the bilingual department, and community agencies 
serving Hispanics. 

A second service gap which exists in Boston is the dearth of 
staff development opportunities for school personnel. The Boston 
Compact, supported by the Bank of New England will release a 
directory of existing options for teachers in September. The 
Boston Education Plan will offer new opportunities to faculty 
over the next several years; however the Commonwealth Futures 
Committee would like to deliver a series of workshops for 
teachers of at-risk youth - from both BPS and alternative 
schools - on new teaching methods, counseling techniques, and 
multi-cultural activities for the classroom. 

Most JCS network alternatives, and in-school programs have an 
informal structure of responsibility between one student and one 
adult staff person who monitors the student's performance and a 
few programs - STEP, Back To School, and Compact Ventures - have 
piloted the case management approach, a formal monitoring system. 
Based on the success of these pilot projects, the Commonwealth 
Futures Committee will recommend that the majority of programs 
move towards case management; the superintendent has also made a 
committement througth the Boston Education Plan to add outreach 
workers to the staff of schools with large at-risk populations. 
This is a third service gap identified by the Committee. 



34 



Our new budget in the amount of $110,000, detailed in Section V 
Part C, represents a cut of $30,000 from the original budget 
submitted to Commonwealth Futures. In the earlier paragraphs in 
this section we outline service gaps which can, in part, be 
addressed by the maximum allocation from Futures. The 
Committee's first priority is to maintain the level of support to 
inter-agency coordination of services as described in the budget 
totaling $122,000 below. Our second priority is an addition to 
the amount available to community agencies who will design 
professional development workshops for teachers. 

1. First Priority Option 

Commonwealth Futures Appropriation 

Commonwealth Futures Staff $32,000 

BPS Alternative Education Coor. $38,500 

JCS Alternative Education Support $30,000 

Fringe (C.F. and BPS only) $ 9,500 

Consultation $30,000 

Total $140,000 

2. Second Priority Option 

Commonwealth Futures Appropriation 

Commonwealth Futures Staff $32,000 

BPS Alternative Educaiton Coor. $36,000 

JCS Alternative Education Support $25,000 

Fringe (C.F. and BPS only) $ 9,500 

Consultation $19,500 

Total $122,000 



The service gap created by a possible reduction in funds from the 
Governor's Education Coordination Grant will result in cutting 
the case management staff and the operations budget from one 
Compact Ventures school. We are seeking $300,0000 from OTEP for 
full services to complete the expansion of Compact Ventures to 
ten schools as originally planned. The difference of $45,000 
provides critically needed services - a case manager and 
instructional support in one school - which are detailed below. 

Personnel 

Case Manager 27,000 

fringe @ 18% 4,860 

Subtotal 31,860 



Operations 




Professional Services 


1,130 


Occupancy 


1,000 


Telephone 


1,000 


Printing 


500 


Exp. Supplies 


800 


Instruc. Supplies 


1,300 


Incentives 


1,310 


Transportation 


600 


Equipment Rental 


600 


Advertising 


400 


Subtotal 


8,640 


Administration 


4,500 


Total 


$45,000 



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1 



SECTION VI — ENDORSEMENTS AND ASSURANCES 

A. Community Collaborators 

Please attach to this plan letters of endorsement from all collaborating 
agendo and /or Individuals mentioned in your community plan which 
specifically commit them to provide listed services, resources, etc. 

B. Community Leadership 

This is to assure that we, the undersigned: 

o Have read the attached Comprehensive Community Plan; 

o Endorse those commitments contained in its contents; and 

o Are committed to work t- ether to assure the success of the 
proposed plan In our community. 




laturi 

Raymond L. Flynn 



Name/Title 

City of Boston 

City Hall 



Address 

Boston, MA 02103 



725-4000 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 




Telephone 



ijfature 

Laval S. Wilson 

Name/Title 

Boston Public Schools 

26 Court Street 

Address 

Boston, MA 02103 

726-6200 
Telephone 



VLu>w 



PIC C 




EOHS DESIGNEE 



Ferdinand Colloredo-Mansf eld 

Name/Title 

Cabot, Cabot & Forbes 

60 State Street 

Address 

Boston, MA 02109 

722-8200 

Telephone 



Signature 

Name/Title 



Address 



Telephone 



39